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2301 Bull Street
Savannah, GA, 31401
United States

9122317105

Sulfur Studios provides affordable studio, exhibition and event space to Savannah's creative community.  

Past Residents

 

ON::View Artist-In-Residency

Past Projects

 

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July 2018

Michele Quick - Shoemaking Demystified

The globalized production of fashion objects has disconnected many consumers from the traditional crafts that used to be highly visible in the production process. During her Residency Michelle Quick will use the ‘on-view’ aspect of this residency as an opportunity to demystify the process of shoemaking and educate viewers about how an object that they interact with every day– shoes - are made.

This project brought together all of Quick's skills as a designer, craftsperson, and educator into one thematic body of work exploring the relationship between design, production, and consumption of fashion objects. So often, emphasis is just placed on the final product, but the artist wants to place equal focus on the materials, making process, and final product by physically showing each phase in the final presentation.


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June 2018

Becky Slivinsky - Objet de Desir

Slivinsky's work begins and ends with the act of cleaning. She questions an ideal standard of beauty that is forced upon women within western culture in searching for the correlation between unrealistic beauty expectations and the ways in which women are portrayed in the media. She explores this by purchasing magazines that can be found in common places, whether it be a drug store or a street cart, and flips through to find images of women that are displayed in different ways. Are their bodies being used as a commodity? Is this “fine-art” photography? Is this modeling? What exactly is it that makes one image professional and another “sexy”?

The image of the woman torn from the magazine is digitally manipulated and cleaning products are sprayed over her and I wipe her clean. The artist's response to her objectification is reactionary. Slivinsky is not cleaning the image because the subject is unclean, rather but rather is reclaiming her right to her body and sexuality through the obliteration of her objectification. The image is altered further by gesturally applying, pouring, spraying and wiping more cleaning products across her washed body in an attempt to force the viewer to examine the way women are seen in the world and ultimately subverting the meaning of the original image.


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May 2018

Page Laughlin - Community Coloringbook

For the Month of May Page Laughlin engaged the ON::View residency space as a living laboratory for developing the Community Coloringbook Project.  This is the next series in the Coloringbook Portfolio and “Paper Doll” Series, large scale oil and digital ink paintings on sheets of paper.  Laughlin works at the intersection between oil painting, photography, and digital drawing.  Starting from photographs she takes of people in her community, Laughlin converts the photos into composite figures and generates a line drawing, a coloring book template, for painterly exploration.

Throughout her residency, Laughlin invited the public to come be a part of the coloringbook project by taking pictures of passerbys for the coloringbook and beginning the transformation from image to line drawing.


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April 2018

Anya Mitchell - Reflections on Desire

Inspired by the neighborhoods and culture of Savannah, Georgia I've been thinking about the way we divide ourselves into living a diversity of ways--thinking about how all our ways of living--for all the differences that exist--are all part of one community--though they feel worlds apart. I've been reflecting on our common desires: desires for a safe place to call home, for our children to be educated, to have access to food.

Reflections on Desires embodies these reflections. Places of intersection in Savannah--homes, schools and grocery stores-- are woven together where patterns in the environment across images reflects the one reality in which these seemingly separate places exist. 

@she__makes


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March 2018

Rob Hessler - Hindenburg (Shared Experiences)

On May 6, 1937 the German zeppelin Hindenburg was destroyed in a spectacular fire captured live on radio by Herbert “Herb” Morrison. The event “went viral” as it spread across newsreels and newspapers, and as Morrison’s “Oh the humanity!” proclamation was re-broadcast on radio stations across the country.

The resonance of this event has sent waves into The Other Side of the World, an alternate universe created by artist Rob Hessler. There it created a self-contained “island” where the after-effects play out on a landscape populated by elements familiar to the incident and with things as they were in our real world at that time. The One in the Duck Feather Cloak, a sentient explorer within this alternate reality, has come to explore this island, experiencing it for us in the present day, and sending back images so that we might understand the Hindenburg’s place in our history.

For this project artist Rob Hessler recreated the Hindenburg disaster at the point where it intersects The Other Side of the World. Leading up to the April 6th First Friday Art March, the space will act as a slowly changing installation piece, set in 1937 during the weeks leading up to the history-altering event. On the evening of the reception, the window on Bull Street turned into a portal to The Other Side of the World, with Hindenburg coming alive as a performance art piece including video, sound, and live actors.

Additional collaborative elements to be provided by videographer Drew Hunt and director/improvisationalist Chris Soucy.


 
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February 2018

Friendship Magic Collective - Greg Eltringham and Honor Bowman Hall. 

Our current ongoing collaborative project titled, “Homecoming,” is an investigation into our immediate environment, focusing on elements found in Savannah. We are interested in creating visual narratives that reflect our experiences in a deeply personal and imaginative painterly language. Our project is a conversation between our own points of reference. At times in synch, and at times tense, we create a dialogue about our lived experiences in Savannah. We employ specific painting strategies utilizing landscape, portraits, and narratives that touch on place, personal context, and transformation. This work is our response to the complex relationships and social dynamics that develop in this confined space. The ultimate goal of this project is to create and record our own visual diaries, evidence of our existence here at this moment in time, and to foster a lasting artistic dialog and friendship.


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January 2018

Troy Wandzell